Archive for the ‘Creative Process’ Category

Innovation in television? Look to the Web.

Check out this useful comment by Mike Hale in today’s NYT heralding the arrival of original video series on the Web.  For too long, broadcasters have regarded the Web as a dumping ground for uninspired promotional content and lame marketing gimmicks for the regular broadcast schedule.  Recently, however, some TV networks are starting to take the Web seriously as a vehicle for rapid, low cost innovation.

The NY TImes piece highlights the distinction between genuinely new programming concepts and old-school marketing masquerading as original content.   Hale also skewers the dubious quality and relentless product placement as obvious defects in some new programs.  But video is expensive to produce, and after all, somebody has to pay the bills.

Such mainstream TV efforts face stiff competition from web pure plays, who are not beholden to corporate policies and are thereby able to innovate more freely.  I’m still betting on the shock value of sites like Comedy.com to capture viewers with a fresh voice unencumbered with an old school broadcaster’s agenda.

This is a useful meme and one that will certainly be explored in more detail at the 5D conference in Long Beach in early October.

Are comic books the future of self help? New Google collaboration with Scott McCloud shows how.

The introduction of Google’s new open source Chrome browser is newsworthy.  So is the way that Google chose to explain the new features to users. Both items are sterling examples of collaborative creativity.

Google teamed up with veteran cartoonist Scott McCloud to create a cool graphic narrative about the new browser.

During a week of breaking news about hurricanes, lurid political drama, and the GOP convention, the Google announcement is likely to get buried in sensational headlines.  But it’s worth your while to check out this new online comic book that illustrates the sophisticated new features of the Chrome browser.   Because this type of presentation just might be the future of self help guidebooks. Continue Reading

Collaborative Creativity now on Australian TV

My speech at the Cross Media Lab in Melbourne was broadcast last week on ABC 2 in Australia.    The theme of this speech was “Collaborative Creativity”, which refers particularly to my passion for including the audience in the process of creating entertainment.    This is harder than it sounds.  I selected three examples from my personal experience in TV, web and mobile to illustrate some of the principals of collaboration via two-way networks.  Not all of these were successful! Continue Reading

Fostering creativity in the workplace

What’s the best way to harness the collective creativity of the entire group of people in your company?

The typical brainstorming session is a bust.  People consider brainstorming a waste of time, or a dead end, or a pointless battle, or a rubber stamp for some executive’s idea.  One of the primary results of the typical brainstorming session is jaded employees.  Surely we can do better!

I recently spent a weekend in a workshop focused on providing attendees with new skills for collaboration on creative projects.   The event was presented by Humantific, the people who have created the NextD movement, and it was hosted at the offices of Martha Stewart Omnimedia on the West Side of Manhattan. Continue Reading